Attractive food

I cannot wait for fresh ingredients to start trickling into my kitchen-

ilkadickens

Those of you who have read this blog before will know I have a bit of an addiction to Pinterest. I’ve been collecting some fantastic recipes which are also beautifully styled and photographed. These shots below are just simply stunning. I’ll probably never make them but I love looking at them. To narrow them down I’ve chosen recipes that are perfect for Spring and Summer (sorry for those of you in the Southern Hemisphere) Click on the image to be taken to the source website and in most cases the recipe.

I’ve never made my own ice cream but I’d love to give this a go this Summer. It looks divine. (unfortunately I don’t have the recipe!)

orange

I love the colour of this triple berry curd made from Blueberries, Raspberries, and Marionberries (a type of blackberry apparently) Frozen berries can be used if you don’t have fresh.

curd

One of my all time…

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Turkey Burgers done in the style of “Use Real Butter”

Turkey Burger ready for the grill

Turkey Burger ready for the grill

Recently, I came across a pin of a recipe that caught my eye.  It linked to a recipe site who did give credit to the site Use Real Butter

.  I have been peeking at Use Real Butter for years and love her contemporary approach to using ingredients that are seasonal in nature and she has a fantastic database of recipes.

If you are looking for something interesting to grill this weekend, give her turkey burgers a shot-

You won’t be disappointed!

~Moist BBQ: Understanding the Reason for the REST~

Mustard Seed Grill

brisket2

Instructions on how to be a BBQ man:   Fire up large smoker. Cook large chunks of meat in smoker. Rip large chunks of meat from smoker with bare hands, bite down, and allow succulent juices to dribble down chin.

Instructions on how to be a BBQ LEGEND:   Fire up large smoker. Cook large chunks of meat in smoker. Rip large chunks of meat from smoker with bare hands, allow meat to rest in a warm place undisturbed until internal temperature falls below 120 degrees. Bite down, and allow succulent juices to dribble down throat.

We’re going to analyze the importance of resting meat. This principle applies to ALL cooked meat, not just BBQ, so pay attention. Aside from over/under-cooking and poor seasoning, not resting meat properly is the biggest cooking blunder that you can make. This mistake is especially painful for those of us that BBQ because we can spend so much time (days literally) in…

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Grilled Cabbage and Bacon Salad

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.

Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.

I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Cabbage wedges wrapped in bacon

I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Cabbage wedges lined up on foil before grilling

I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Foiled cabbage on the grill at about 350F

The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Cabbage got golden brown in places from the grilling

The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.

As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Cooking on the grill brings out flavors and tastes that constantly amaze me.  It’s not that I have anything against making dinner on the conventional cook top or even in the oven, but the grill brings a sneak attack of flavor that pots and pans seldom provide.  I like to experiment with what the grill does to make food taste better, and how I can use that to my advantage whenever possible.  Spices, seasonings, marinades, rubs, and smoke come to mind as way to kick up a flavor profile but sometimes a hot grill and good ingredients prevail as the secret weapon in making a dish extraordinary.  Lately, we have been embracing a lower-carb menu and I was thinking of a way to present a bratwurst which would make me forget all about the bun.  I thought a play on cole slaw, a warm cole slaw of sorts, would be a fun change of pace and could just fill the bill.  My thought was to wilt the cabbage on the grill and then give it a dunk in blue cheese dressing just before service for a warm, grilled cole slaw effect.  What I ended up making was entirely different.  I took a head of cabbage and cut it in half and then down to quartered wedges.  The wedges had a thick, fibrous stalk in the middle which I removed and discarded.  I wrapped the wedges in raw bacon and began to engineer a vessel out of foil to cook the cabbage.  I figured a couple of sheets of foil would be a little more sturdy and act as a good heat shield so I laid two identical pieces down on the work surface.  I placed the wedges in the center of foil like a couple of cub scouts sitting in a canoe.  Basically, I fashioned around the cabbage a boat with a sturdy bottom, thick walls, and an open top.  I figured that the three walls of foil around the bacon would help it cook and the sunroof on top would let in flavor while letting out steam.  The cabbage canoe went on the raised grill grate over direct heat at about 350F and roasted for a good 45 minutes.  As anticipated, the bacon roasted around the cabbage wedge, imposing its smoky, salty flavor on the otherwise listless cabbage.  A combination of flavorful bacon juices and grill magic transformed the cabbage into a sweet, robust salad of enhanced flavors.  When I cut into the wedge, the cabbage was easy to cut thru without being a wet, puddled mess.  The inner cabbage was browned, almost caramelized.  Its nutty sweetness locked horns with the salty, crisp bacon.  The combination of the two different flavors is nothing short of grill magic.  Tough to explain, but easy to enjoy.  As a side dish, Bacon Wrapped Cabbage Wedges don’t get much easier to make.  What started out as accompaniment to a main dish, these bacon wrapped cabbage wedges ended up stealing the spotlight.  The wedges got gobbled up so fast they did not even last long enough to become cole slaw.  They were so good, I don’t really remember what else was on the menu.

Bacon wrapped grilled cabbage with a couple of sides-

Masters Pimento Cheese Sandwich Recipe

Masters Pimento Cheese Sandwich from Agusta National

Masters Pimento Cheese Sandwich from Agusta National

Lots of people look forward to the Masters each year for a variety of reasons.  A good friend of mine attended the tournament years ago and could not stop raving about the Pimento Sandwiches.  Not something we normally dine on in the Pacific Northwest, the Pimento Sandwich is simply made with a few common ingredients from the pantry.  -get the recipe here

It's much easier to get a cheap lunch at Augusta National than to get a membership-

It’s much easier to get a cheap lunch at Augusta National than to get a membership-

Masters tournament lunches made the same way for decades

Masters tournament lunches made the same way for decades

Somehow I stumbled on a post about The Masters Pimento Cheese and Egg Salad Sandwich from the Plain Chicken site.  I cannot wait to try a Pimento Grilled Cheese sandwich later on my Big Green egg!

Egg Salad Sandwich just like at the Masters

Egg Salad Sandwich just like at the Masters

Even though I would rather drink muddy water and sleep in a hollow log than eat eggs, I do respect that the Augusta style egg salad sandwich looks fantastic and they have it priced well

Lunch at Augusta National for 4 $ 20!

Lunch at Augusta National for 4 $ 20!

Any predictions on who will win?  Happy Masters weekend!

 

Keeping it Lo-Carb at the Drive Thru

Keeping it Lo- Carb at the Drive Thru

With a little persuasion, Wendy’s served me up some protein without the bun

Keeping it Lo- Carb at the Drive Thru

The square burgers were quite good and very juicy, order extra napkins-

 

 

 

 

 

I was really hungry the other day and in that strange time of the day in between meals.  I had not had much for lunch other than a couple of cheese sticks and needed a protein fix fast.  Since we have no In and Out burger in Montana, I thought Wendy’s would be as good a substitute as any under the circumstances.  I do not know if Wendy’s is better than the other fast food chains as far as nutritional value, but I do know that Wendy’s food is fresh, not frozen.  This was as good an excuse as any to give it a shot.

Rounding the bend to the drive thru order area, I took a deep breath before I asked the metal speaker box: “Uh,can you make me a burger that’s all protein?”  I could hear the pimples on the other end frantically scrambling to determine what the heck I was talking about.  The response was quite polite asking me to please be more specific.  “Um, can you make me a burger with like some lettuce instead of a bun wrapping it or something?”  On the other end, a long pause, a sustained push on the mute button, and then the metal box responded, “Yeah- we can do that for you…  Anything else?”  “Um- maybe just a water.”

Driving up to the window, I did not know what to expect.  The pimples took my fiver and handed me some random change along with a bag nonchalantly and without judgement.  I drove around the corner and parked.  Opening the sunroof, and the Wendy’s bag at the same time, I reached in and pulled out some kind of a neatly packaged container.  Taking note of the packaging, my emotions went from a bit embarrassed, to feeling that my drive thru meal was bordering on elegant.  Although I knew what I was getting because I ordered it, the packaging evoked the type of investigative curiosity that I feel when a flight attendant hands over a meal box on a multi-time-zone flight.

The burgers were juicy, very juicy, and very hot!  I cradled the bottom with the lettuce and stuck a thumb in the top as I took a bite.  It was tasty and just what I needed.  A few days later, I went to a different Wendy’s.  Ordering the same thing, it came out the same way.  I don’t know if they have a protocol for fussy customers like me, but chances are that I will be back to test them again.

Making Stuffed Cheeseburgers and Curly Hot Dogs With Items You Already Have in Your Kitchen

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

You don’t need a special burger press to make yummy stuffed burgers

After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Start by splitting your burger meat in half

Take the half of a burger meat and press it into the bottom of a ramekin.  If you are smart, you will spray some non stick food release in the bottom, and around the inside of your ramekin so it comes out easily when you are done.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Half the burger meat pressed into the ramekin

Now cut your cheese stuffing into cubes and place it in the middle of the burger patty.  Most melting cheeses would probably work fine, but I chose pepper jack for this burger.  Grilled onions, pickles, bacon bits, or blue cheese would probably also go really well, but that would be a matter of preference.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Cheese placed in the center of the burger

Take the other half of the burger meat and top the cheese. Be sure to press down evenly so that the top and bottom half’s adhere to each other.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Food release helps the burger come out much easier than without

Now it is time to hit the burger with your favorite seasonings and head to the grill.  I grilled the stuffed burgers at about 350F which is a little cooler than normal for a little extra time to make sure that the cheese melted.

Stuffed burgers can be a really fun and yummy alternative to regular cheeseburgers, but with a pleasant surprise inside!  I pondered purchasing a fancy burger making machine to stuff burgers, but could not think of how else I could possibly use it and really did not have the extra storage space.  After a few attempts at trial and error, this is the technique that I came up with using little more than a ramekin.

Burgers cooked for just a little longer than normal, but not much

What we ended up with was a juicy, cheesy, and extremely flavorful burger!  Even though burgers are not much of a novelty, these stuffed burgers cooked over hardwood lump charcoal on the Big Green Egg turned out delicious!

If you want to read more about the rest of this cook, where the burgers are joined by curly hot dogs you can check it out here:

http://www.makeitmissoula.com/2012/07/grilling-recipe-cheese-stuffed-burgers-curly-hot-dogs/

Room Service Food Can Be Lo-Carb When Traveling for Business

Hotel Room Service can be Lo-Carb if you know what to order

Hotel Room Service can be Lo-Carb if you know what to order

Lo-Carb is a lifestyle I am currently embracing which brings significant challenges when I travel.  I have been learning that even when faced with few dinner options, with a little creativity I can still keep my meals Lo-Carb.

Lo- Carb dinners can be found when traveling, but beware of accompanying pitfalls like french fries

Lo- Carb dinners can be found when traveling, but beware of accompanying pitfalls like french fries

I ordered Duck Wings as a pre dinner snack.  I realized that I made a couple of mistakes in my ordering when the cloche was removed from my appetizer.  I was so hungry that I just scarfed down one of the wings.  After I took a few deep breaths, I pushed the plate away because I feared that the wings were breaded which is a ketosis no-no.  Fortunately, after further inspection, I realized it was just the crispy skin of the duck wings which provided the wonderfully guilty feeling crunch.  On the other hand, I completely forgot to ask them to omit the fries.  They smelled and looked so good, and were topped with fried rosemary to further lure me in.  My willpower did prevail as I moved the duck wings to a plate sans fries and put cloche-er to temptation.

I ordered Duck Wings as a pre dinner snack.  I realized that I made a couple of mistakes in my ordering when the cloche was removed from my appetizer.  I was so hungry that I just scarfed down one of the wings.  After I took a few deep breaths, I pushed the plate away because I feared that the wings were breaded which is a ketosis no-no.  Fortunately, after further inspection, I realized it was just the crispy skin of the duck wings which provided the wonderfully guilty feeling crunch.  On the other hand, I completely forgot to ask them to omit the fries.  They smelled and looked so good, and were topped with fried rosemary to further lure me in.  My willpower did prevail as I moved the duck wings to a plate sans fries and put cloche-er to temptation.

A cheeseburger without the bun and sautéd veggies instead of fries made for a nice Lo-Carb dinner

A burger is pretty much a staple restaurant item you can get almost anywhere, and hotel room service is no exception.  I have found that a burger without the bun can be quite satisfying and fill my protein void without jeopardizing an increased carb count.  I did remember to ask them to substitute the fries for a veggie and the garlic beans they sent along were quite tasty.  I do really miss eating bread products and a chewy burger bun is no exception.  Usually after I try the other things on the plate, the bun becomes the least appetizing thing on the plate

Lo- Carb Leftover Lunch

Leftovers can be lo carb too!

Leftovers can be lo carb too!

A simple Lo- Carb skillet lunch.  Leftover spiral ham from Easter was trimmed and diced up.  I sautéed it slowly in a little butter.  Yesterday, I cooked up a really nice boneless pork roast on my Big Green Egg so I was excited to have some leftover pork as well.   With the ham and pork, a few slices of cheddar cheese went into the skillet and a squirt of sriracha and the skillet lunch was good to go.

If only I liked eggs…